Advocacy and the Equality Act
Tuesday, October 8, 2019
by: Adonai Mack

Section: From Contributors


Adonai Mack



This past September, NASS and the Association of California School Administrators convened for our annual federal advocacy conference. Participants heard from former Secretary for Education, Rod Paige, and several LBGTQ students on their experience matriculating through our K12 schools. This year we lobbied on the Equality Act, special education funding for infants and toddlers, STEM education and federal spending on education.
This past September, NASS and the Association of California School Administrators convened for our annual federal advocacy conference. Participants heard from former Secretary for Education, Rod Paige, and several LBGTQ students on their experience matriculating through our K12 schools.  This year we lobbied on the Equality Act, special education funding for infants and toddlers, STEM education and federal spending on education.  

Paige shared insightful information regarding his time as Superintendent of Houston Independent School District, as well as shared his vast experience of building a team that was aligned to his values and principles. He shared his process for developing team members who focused on the best interest of students, as well as how to change behavior around the goals and the expectations established by the board trustees.  Paige’s stories of building and managing different stakeholders provided conference participants a clear example of the dedication and hard work that is needed to lead a successful district. 

NASS partnered with the Human Rights Campaign to provide a student voice to the experience of LGBTQ students in our public education system.  The students, who hailed from several different states articulated the ongoing necessity and impact of providing equity in the school environment. The students testified to the increasing need for adults to be advocates for those who do not have a voice and support their fellow students to advocate for themselves.  They gave excellent strategies for how adults can support students who struggle with their sexual identity and to alleviate the bullying culture that often occurs to LGBTQ youth. The student voice was powerful and insightful.   

The Federal advocacy day ended with participants meeting with the offices of their representatives to share perspectives on legislative priorities. Superintendent’s using their voice and stories provide critical input for policy makers. 
Post a Comment

Name
Email
Comment