President Trump Slashes Federal Education Funds for Vouchers
Friday, February 14, 2020
by: Adonai Mack

Section: From Contributors


Adonai Mack

President Trump Slashes Federal Education Funds for Vouchers

On Monday, February 10th, President Trump unveiled his budget request for Congress’ consideration. The proposal includes an increase for career technical education (CTE) programs to the tune of $900 million. In addition, the President includes $5 billion for his school voucher proposal titled the Education Freedom Scholarships. The budget also provides $13 billion for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part B, an increase of $100 million over last year's budget. Conversely, the overall Department of Education budget is cut by 7.8 percent, equivalent to $5.8 billion.
On Monday, February 10, President Trump unveiled his budget request for Congress’ consideration. The proposal includes an increase for career technical education (CTE) programs to the tune of $900 million. In addition, the President includes $5 billion for his school voucher proposal titled the Education Freedom Scholarships. The budget also provides $13 billion for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part B, an increase of $100 million over last year's budget. Conversely, the overall Department of Education budget is cut by 7.8 percent, equivalent to $5.8 billion.  

While the president invests in CTE and vouchers, his proposal makes significant changes and cuts in other areas. The budget proposal includes a consolidation of 29 federal grant programs into a newly created Elementary and Secondary Education for the Disadvantaged Block Grant. All 29 programs will be allocated to state education departments and allocated similarly to Title I programs. However, the block grant comes with a $4.7 billion reduction in overall funding. 

The chair of each budget committee had criticism for the president’s budget. Senator Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) noted that “no one pays attention to the president’s budget,” and Representative John Yarmuth (D-KY) believes the president is “proposing deep cuts to critical programs that help American families and protect our national security.”

With an election upon us, it is unlikely that Congress will move swiftly to pass a budget in 2020. Expect another long and drawn out process before Congress finalizes the budget for 2021 fiscal year.
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